A Travellerspoint blog

November 2010

P-P-Picking Up Penguins in the C-C-Cold Cold South

Christchurch, Franz Joseph, Queenstown, Milford Sound, Invercargill and Dunedin

16th – 25th November

We arrived into Christchurch to discover that someone had turned the heating "on". It was sweltering as we wandered around the capital of the South Island admiring the cathedral, expensive souvenir shops and the ruins of the historic buildings that had crumbled in the recent earthquake. To be honest, the quake hadn't caused the devastation I had imagined, but you could certainly notice the large amounts of scaffolding around the city, holding up, or pulling down the remnants of buildings. We walked along the riverbank to find a pub and felt glad that we weren’t spending a great deal of time in what was a pretty unmemorable city and one that seems to go to sleep at 7pm.

Picking up the car the next day, we felt a huge sense of freedom, and set off on the open road across the transalpine crossing through Arthur’s Pass to Greymouth. The roads became increasingly tortuous, the scenery soon became more mountainous and unfortunately the weather soon became more grey and cloudy, although the views of the mist hanging below the mountain tops were quite stunning. We arrived at our African themed (?) hostel in Greymouth just in time to watch the sun set.

Setting off early the following morning, our spirits were dampened by an over-zealous Kiwi copper with nothing better to do than give Pete a ticket for “failing to stop at a junction” despite the fact it was the back of beyond with no other cars in sight for miles. We felt tempted to speed off to our next destination to cool down, the world famous Franz Joseph Glacier, where we’d booked an afternoon guided hike.

The sky had began to clear and sweltering in our “Scott of Antarctica” gear, we followed the guide to the beginning of the ice field where he literally “showed us the ropes” that we had to cling on to and gave us instructions on how to fit our crampons. The glacier looming large ahead of us was pretty daunting as we set out tentatively in a long line on the bright blue ice. Ducking in and out of the ice tunnels and climbing the steps made in the frosty surface was quite challenging but good fun and the group photo ops with the pick axe near the top certainly helped to “break the ice”.

The weather had once again deteriorated the next morning as we completed our set of glaciers with a wind and rain-swept trek to the foot of the Fox Glacier. After an overnight stop in the “adventure capital” of Queenstown (looked very much like a tourist trap) and not having the money or inclination to go bungying, skydiving, paragliding, zorbing or jet boating, we “jetted” right out the next morning in the pouring rain. We just made it to Te Anau in time to book up for the last boat trip out of Milford Sound, and sped off to the remote but incredibly picturesque outpost of the New Zealand Fjord lands. Waiting in line to enter a very scary and long tunnel through the mountainside, we were surprised when a couple of Keas (alpine parrots – much like the Norwegian Blue, except green and very much alive) settled on a nearby road sign, just as the lights changed.

Our peaceful cruise around the sound was an unforgettable experience and we saw several seal lions along with some lovely little penguins and a couple of large waterfalls amongst the towering mountains. With the sun shining on the water, it was absolutely stunning.

Felt sad the next day as I said goodbye to Urvy and Pete as they made their way back to Christchurch for their flight to Oz. Although I’m generally happy travelling solo, it made a nice change to have some great company for a day or so. We got on really well, had a good laugh, shared some fantastic experiences, and hopefully will meet again in Brisbane at Christmas.

I’d decided to have an extra day in Te Anau to re-charge batteries and start planning my Australian trip, and settled into the pleasant hostel, only venturing out for a quick walk along the pretty, but blustery lake front. It was incredibly beautiful in the early morning light the next morning, as I waited for my bus further south to Invercargill. Invercargill, however, was unfortunately not incredibly beautiful – think Harlow/Crawley crossed with the South Pole! The funny thing is the town is also (like Harlow/Crawley) full of charity shops, but also seemed to have an abundance of sex shops! I’m not sure if this (or the weather) had anything to do with the fact that the town was empty by 7.30pm???

Cue another day, avoiding the cold, holed up in my hostel – which amazingly had FREE wifi! I’ve made a strange discovery….the further south you go in New Zealand the colder the weather gets and the cheaper (but slower) the internet becomes! The one interesting fact about Invercargill is that it has a large population of students. Apparently they decided to offer free college education but fund it by putting a high tax on alcohol. The students don’t realize until they finish their education, that they have actually ended up paying more for their degrees than anywhere else in the country. Classic!

Not too sad to be leaving, I had a great day travelling along the scenic south coast through the Catlins to the University town of Dunedin. The views along the route lived up to my expectations and our driver Brian, apart from being quite informative and interesting (unlike all the other bus drivers I’d had), was a bit of a wit – and found it quite amusing that I was an “Essex girl” – I can’t believe our reputation has travelled all the way to New Zealand! Saw a couple of cute little yellow eyed penguins (the rarest in the world) and lots of sea lions (alive this time) plus some petrified trees (not sure what had scared them so).

Dunedin is Gaelic for Edinburgh and it has many similarities (the weather is about the same, the architecture is pretty gothic - it even has a castle, although thankfully all the students have finished for the Christmas holidays and not a deep fried Mars bar or set of bagpipes in sight). The sun was shining the next day, so I set off by bus and foot to explore the Otago Peninsular. Cue more amazing scenery and beautiful pastoral scenes which just about made up for some very, very steep hills. I just managed to get to Larnach Castle before needing oxygen, but was rewarded with a close up view of New Zealand’s only castle and it’s magnificent gardens.

Feeling slightly recovered after lunch, I set off down the hill to the beaches on the other side of the peninsular. The man on the entry gate of the castle took pity on me (and thought I was rather mad to be walking all this way) and gave me a lift to Sandfly Beach. Hopping down the soaring dunes, I was treated to a glimpse of one of the most spectacular stretches of sand, and soon spotted several lounging sea lions as well as a penguin scurrying back to his nest, as I cooled my weary feet in the surf.

After a long clamber back up the dunes, I decided enough was enough, and against my better instincts decided to try my hand (or my thumb) at hitch-hiking (well, this was New Zealand – statistically the chances of being picked up by an axe-murderer must be lower, surely?). After climbing up yet another vertical road, a very kind Dutch couple took pity on me and gave me a lift back to the castle, where at least I only had a downhill hike to navigate.

On the bus back, I was saddened to hear about the second explosion and the near certain death of the miners in Greymouth. I was beginning to get a complex, after being in Chile while the miners were being released, and wondered if I had somehow been possessed by the mining Devil when I was down the pit in Bolivia. Western Australia had better watch out.

Arthur's Pass National Park

Arthur's Pass National Park


Franz Jospeh Glacier

Franz Jospeh Glacier


Milford Sound

Milford Sound


Lake at Dawn, Te Anau

Lake at Dawn, Te Anau


Wild Lupins, Otago Peninsular

Wild Lupins, Otago Peninsular


Mitre Peak Milford Sound

Mitre Peak Milford Sound


Arthur's *ass!

Arthur's *ass!


Arthur's Pass National Park

Arthur's Pass National Park


Me, Urvy and Pete Breaking the Ice

Me, Urvy and Pete Breaking the Ice


Kathy The Explorer

Kathy The Explorer


Ice Hole!

Ice Hole!


Waterfall Milford Sound

Waterfall Milford Sound


Fox Glacier

Fox Glacier


Allo...Allo....I'm On The Phone

Allo...Allo....I'm On The Phone


Scary shared rail and road bridge!

Scary shared rail and road bridge!


Franz Joseph Glacier

Franz Joseph Glacier


Otago Peninsular

Otago Peninsular


Don't Take It Personally Pete!

Don't Take It Personally Pete!


Milford Sound

Milford Sound


Mirror Lakes

Mirror Lakes


Milford Sunset

Milford Sunset


Ten Anau Dawn

Ten Anau Dawn


Invercargill Theatre

Invercargill Theatre


Windswept Trees The Catlins

Windswept Trees The Catlins


Beautiful Beach, The Catlins

Beautiful Beach, The Catlins


Sea Lion, Sandfly Beach

Sea Lion, Sandfly Beach


Otago Peninsular View

Otago Peninsular View


Lighthouse, Nugget Point, The Catlins

Lighthouse, Nugget Point, The Catlins


Lost Gypsy Caravan, The Catlins

Lost Gypsy Caravan, The Catlins


Yellow Eyed Penguin, Catlins

Yellow Eyed Penguin, Catlins


Kiwi Cuddlin'

Kiwi Cuddlin'


View From Lanarch Castle Otago

View From Lanarch Castle Otago


Weird Tree, Otago Peninsular, Dunedin

Weird Tree, Otago Peninsular, Dunedin


Otago Peninsular View

Otago Peninsular View


Otago Peninsular, Dunedin

Otago Peninsular, Dunedin


Sandfly Beach

Sandfly Beach


Giant Cone, Christchurch

Giant Cone, Christchurch

Posted by kathystravels 16:00 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

Smells, Swells, Whales and Gales

Rotorua, Taupo, Napier, Wellington and Kaikoura

November 7th – 16th

Alighting from the coach in Rotorua you are immediately hit with the whiff of bad eggs. The region is one of New Zealand's most active thermal areas – the place is full of hot geysers and you can fart to your heart’s content and blame it on the sulphur - what’s not to like?!

I took a stroll through the very colonial Government Gardens, complete with bandstand, bowling greens, swimming baths and croquet courts – bizarrely offset with fenced-off bubbling mud pools. Everywhere you go here you run into hot water – be it steaming springs or exploding mud puddles. Even the lake has a section where the water reaches 42 degrees (Sulphur Bay) and you are in serious risk of getting scalded just taking a stroll. The lake is too hot to support much food for the thousands of birds (including the stunning black swans) which make it their home, but they must enjoy the temperature as it’s teaming with birdlife.

I decided to succumb to the tourist hype and booked a Maori Show that evening at the Mitae Maori Village. It was as cringe-making as I expected but enjoyable enough. To see the "Hakka" performed by a cast of dozens was impressive, and some of the “Maori warriors” were quite fit, but I really didn’t need to be constantly asked to imitate everything in Maori along with the facial expressions. Audience participation really isn’t my thing! Nor was being stuck on a dinner table full of miserable Norwegians, Swedes and Croatians, who didn’t even seem to want to speak to each other, let alone to me (I tried, I really did). It was a long evening!

The next morning I’d booked a trip to the`Wai-O-Tapu Thermal Wonderland’, one of the most famous thermal reserves. Our first stop was at the Lady Knox Geyser which erupted each day at 10.15am (with a little prompting with a bit of soap powder chucked down it!). It was pretty impressive when it got going though, and shot up around 15 – 10 metres. The park was very well arranged and the weird and wonderful landscape of bright green lakes, bubbling mud pools, multi-coloured mineral terraces and steaming hot springs was a sight to behold. I finished off the day with a walk along the lakeside, visiting the Maori village of Ohinemutu with it’s carved meeting and eating houses (a third of the population were still of Maori origin and the culture was strong here) and the steamy Kuirau Park (and very hot duck pond!).

Headed off to another lakeside town, Taupo, the next day- supposedly the adrenaline capital of New Zealand. Having met up with Urvy and Pete (the couple I had met in the Bay of Islands), we set off for a sedate walk to the Huka Falls. We had to pass by the Bungy Jumping Centre and watched a few crazy people plunging on huge ropes into the Waikato river. I wasn’t tempted (much)! The falls were pretty formidable and I decided the jetboat was probably not a good idea either – I must be getting old. The sun was setting as we walked back past the hot springs which did look quite appealing, as people lounged in the warm water amongst the rocks. But a cold glass of wine (or two) back at the hostel won, and I enjoyed a companionable evening with my new friends.

Off again the next day (never a dull moment!) to Napier, the seaside town which had been devastated by a huge earthquake in 1931 and was entirely re-built in the in-vogue Art Deco style of the time. It had echoes of Eastbourne and Hastings, with it’s wonderful Soundshell Auditorium and Marine Parade Gardens and fountains. The town’s buildings were carefully preserved in the styles of the 1930’s, and the verandas, lamps, frescos and lead-light windows were marvellous. If only I’d packed my fringed dress and cigarette holder.

I took a long walk “Up the Bluff” which offers stunning views over the working port, and had fish and chips overlooking the bay. Walked back down through the earthquake ravaged cemetery and quaint botanical gardens (the budgerigar aviary evoked fond memories of my childhood days in Valentines Park).

Greatly enjoyed the Art Deco walking tour the next morning which highlighted the architectural styles and gave some background to the town’s unstable history around the time of the earthquake (it acquired an incredible 40 sq kilometres of land overnight, altering the whole landscape!). Just had time for a bit of hokey pokey (ice cream) before setting off once again to the National Capital of Wellington.

I had been invited by friend of a friend to spend a few days staying at their lovely house on the outskirts of the town, which proved a welcome break from hostelling. Karen, Tony and family made me feel right at home, and took me into town the next morning to explore Mount Victoria on the cable car. Again, the weather had been glorious (if more than a little breezy) and we enjoyed a coffee in the Botanical Gardens overlooking the bay, before I headed off to discover the sights of “Windy Welly” (by a not very informative hop on hop off bus). The very modern and regenerated waterfront incorporated the snazzy new “Te Papa” museum which I decided to visit the following day.

Sadly the clouds had rolled in over the bay the next morning, but I made the most of my last day by visiting the fascinating and comprehensive museum, which contained examples of Maori artefacts and houses along with offering an interesting glimpse into the history and geology of this relatively new land and it’s immigrants (along with a really cool giant squid!). Just time for a quick farewell drink with my adoptive family before jumping on the ferry over to the South Island.

My hostel was thankfully only a short drag of my case along the harbour in the dark, and I awoke the next morning to the sound of seagulls in the pretty, if small, coastal town of Picton. After a futile attempt to find an internet cafe. This place is soooo behind in global technology – the first country on my travels that I have had to pay to use the internet. I swear that most people here think that being “on-line” is something to do with fishing. I gave up and settled on a stroll along the waterfront watching the ferries come in. Met up with Urvy and Pete again to catch the bus to Kaikoura, where we had planned to go whale watching.

There seems to be two types of bus drivers in New Zealand, those who feel that they have to impart every last piece of information regarding the proportion of citizens who use the public transit system and how many years a particular winery has been producing a certain type of grape, and those that say bugger all (even when the bus is supposed to be a sightseeing bus –see above). Our bus driver to Kaikoura was unfortunately one of the former and soon had us driven to our iPods in submission. What felt like many hours (and irrelevant facts) later, we were relieved to pull into the seaside town and I was happy to discover that my hostel was literally a step away from the bus stop (my criteria in choosing hostels included “location from bus stop” as one of the most important points). “The Fish Tank” was appropriately decorated in sub aquatic styles even down to the Perspex fish encrusted loo seats, and was one of the nicest I had stayed (or should that be “swam” in). The next morning I set off for the advertised “two hour” (yes, if you were Linford Christie!) walk around the headland and took in the seal colony (one elderly seal lounging on a rock, who I think might have actually been deceased), along with some pretty impressive rock formations and amazing views along the coastline.

That afternoon, we made our way to the Whale Watching boat, trying not to get too excited – but optimistic that we would get to see at least a brief glimpse of these large mammals. The weather had turned quite squally and we were warned that the a sea sickness alert was in place. Just thinking about it made me feel slightly moby (excuse the pun), and the fact that they kept mentioning it didn’t help. Several choppy minutes later, we stopped just in the nick of time, with a rumoured sighting of a “spout” (just before I was actually about to “spout” myself). Several dolphins had been shadowing the boat on the way out, and the anticipation mounted as we pulled alongside the first of our huge sperm whales. The massive creature was an impressive sight and we were told to expect it to submerge at any time. Eventually the colossal tail flipped up and then slapped down on the surface, sending a cascade of water into the air as the whale dived down to the ocean depths. We were treated to a couple more similar sightings before we had to turn back to shore, against the backdrop of the snow covered mountains – a truly memorable experience.

The weather had improved by the following morning and I enjoyed a brief but picturesque walk along the beach taking in the wonderful mountain views, before catching the bus south to Christchurch.

The Hakka

The Hakka


Thermal Wonderland

Thermal Wonderland


Napier Art Deco

Napier Art Deco


Wellington Harbour

Wellington Harbour


Kaikoura Beach Front

Kaikoura Beach Front


Whale of a Tail

Whale of a Tail


One Hot Geyser

One Hot Geyser


Sulphur Bay

Sulphur Bay


Two Headed Swan - Lake Rotorua

Two Headed Swan - Lake Rotorua


Huka Falls Taupo

Huka Falls Taupo


Mitae Maori Village

Mitae Maori Village


Whoar!

Whoar!


Wai-O-Tapu Steaming Lake

Wai-O-Tapu Steaming Lake


Sulphur Crystals

Sulphur Crystals


Green Mineral Lake Wai-O-Tapu

Green Mineral Lake Wai-O-Tapu


Float Plane Lake Rotorua

Float Plane Lake Rotorua


Tama-te-Kapua Meeting House, Ohinemutu

Tama-te-Kapua Meeting House, Ohinemutu


Ready cooked duck!

Ready cooked duck!


Ferns

Ferns


Big Mac and Flies!  McDonalds,Taupo

Big Mac and Flies! McDonalds,Taupo


Lake Taupo

Lake Taupo


Aaaah!

Aaaah!


Art Deco Building, Napier

Art Deco Building, Napier


Big Ball - Wellington!

Big Ball - Wellington!


Giant toffee wrappers - Te Papa Wellington

Giant toffee wrappers - Te Papa Wellington


Picton Poppies, Sea Front

Picton Poppies, Sea Front


Rock Formations, Kaikoura

Rock Formations, Kaikoura


Building Art, Kaikoura

Building Art, Kaikoura


Mountains from Kaikoura High St

Mountains from Kaikoura High St


Lazy Seal, Kaikoura

Lazy Seal, Kaikoura


There She Blows! Sperm Whale, Kaikoura

There She Blows! Sperm Whale, Kaikoura


Dusky Dolphins, Kaikoura

Dusky Dolphins, Kaikoura


Mountain Views, Kaikoura

Mountain Views, Kaikoura


Beach Front, Kaikoura

Beach Front, Kaikoura

Posted by kathystravels 16:00 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

The Land of the Long White Cloud

New Zealand – North Island

Auckland, The Bay of Islands and Waitomo October 30th – November 5th

Managed a few hours of restless sleep on the long flight from Los Angeles to Auckland, despite the screaming brat in the row next to me, and the fact that I'd gotten used to a bit more leg room on those South American buses. At least the thought of a 13 hour flight doesn’t faze me at all any more, now I’ve done a few 24 hour bus journeys. It was weird taking off on Thursday evening and landing on Saturday morning having crossed the International Date Line. I had lost a whole day and this time without any alcohol being involved!

After a quick nap, I dragged myself out to see the sights of downtown Auckland and found myself in the middle of the Diwali celebrations. I was in heaven – a whole street full of Indian food stalls, and some great Bollywood dancing and music on the stage. Continuing to get my bearings I wandered down to the historic old harbour, stocked up at the supermarket (decided I could give "Sheep World" a miss -I wonder if they have a “Big Dipper”??) and as the jetlag kicked in, settled down to an early night.

After a good rest, I awoke the next morning to glorious sunshine and took the ferry over to Waiheke Island in the Bay, which is known as the “Wine Island” (I felt strangely drawn), after the number of vineyards that take advantage of it’s perfect climate. Rather than go on an organized tour I visited a couple of wineries and explored this pretty island by bus and by foot. Had lunch on the most incredible white sand beach– it really is beautiful here – clean, safe, the people are really friendly – a bit like the UK used to be. The wine was pretty good too – any place that has a wine called “Shag Rock” is alright by me!

Sobered up with a stroll along Blackpool Beach (not a Big One or “Kiss Me Quick” hat in sight), I caught the ferry back into town and had a leisurely wander along the harbor where a large memorial reminded me that this was where the Rainbow Warrior was sabotaged back in the 80s. Arrived back just in time to catch the fireworks signaling the end of the Indian Festivities and sadly almost the end of my stay in New Zealand’s largest city.

For my final day I decided to go on my own little Auckland Marathon (inspired by the real thing which had taken place the day before) and set off on a 16km “Coast to Coast” walk, which passed by Mount Eden and One Tree Hill. The place names told me that this wasn’t going to be a stroll in the park and I had a feeling that my poor old feet would never forgive me. I was however rewarded with great views over the city from these two extinct volcanoes, and caught an interesting insight into the different neighbourhoods and distinctive old houses and gardens which make up the suburbs.

As I boarded my bus the next morning to Paihai, the gateway to the Bay of Islands, I felt excited to be making the journey to the far north of the island.

The small seaside town was a real contrast from the vast metropolis I had just left, and as I took in the views from the promenade, I started planning my next few days. The nearby site of Waitangi was where the treaty was signed between the Maoris and the British establishing British Sovereignty in New Zealand, and there were traces of colonial history all around the area – from Captain Cook’s landing site just off Roberton Island, to the historic town of Russell across the bay, once known as “the Hellhole of the Pacific” when used as a stop off point by the whaling ships.

I woke early the next morning for my first trip which took me the very northernmost point of the island, Cape Reinga. We stopped off at the Kauri Forest – one of New Zealand`s oldest and largest trees. Bizarrely these trees are actually “mined” – the value of their wood is so high that they are excavated from underground (where they have lain for thousands of years) for the furniture industry.

The Cape is where the Tasman Sea and the Pacific Ocean meet and is truly spectacular. It is believed that this is the place where Maori spirits depart the earth when they die and I have to admit, it really did feel quite “spiritual” – I had another “moment”! We had great fun sand boarding down the huge dunes that form the beginning of “90 Mile Beach” and then proceeded to drive the length of this desert coast. A stop off for “fush and chups” overlooking Mangonui Harbour rounded off the day perfectly.

The following morning I took to the water with a dolphin watching cruise around the bay followed by a trip to Cape Brett and Motukokako (Hole in the Rock to you and me). Apparently the chances of seeing dolphins was more than 90%, but the chances of the boat being able to get through the hole were significantly less than Susan Boyle being able to get into the Playboy Mansion. Either one would have been a bonus, but luckily we managed to do both. We had only just set off before Flipper and his missus started following the boat, but we’d been told there was a whole pod just ahead of us (I assumed they didn’t mean peas). Passing by Roberton Island (Captain Cook, Endeavor, blah blah), we sighted them and they gracefully darted back and forth under us, as we all rushed from one side of the boat to the other trying to spot them, like a bunch of demented lemmings.

Once we reached the rock shaped like a giant polo mint, we were treated to the sight of hundreds of sea birds – when we got up closer, we saw there was a huge shoal of fish just under the water. If that wasn’t enough excitement for one day, the skipper decided he was going to try and make it through the hole, even though the clearance was minimal. We raced through the small tunnel and out the other side like a rat through a drainpipe – very exhilarating. Stops at picturesque Otehei Bay and then Russell for lunch, calmed us down and I arrived back in Paihia just in time to catch my bus back to Auckland.

Up early again the next morning for my early bus to Waitomo – home of the famous glowworm caves. We were dropped off outside the caves and went on a short, but fascinating tour through the underground caverns that provide the perfect conditions for the millions of glowworms that make them their home.

Their life cycle consists of the female laying around 120 eggs, but only around 20 survive (the rest are eaten by their siblings - nice). The larvae build a nest and then lay down sticky lines a bit like spider’s webs to catch insects to eat. Over the next 9 months the larvae grow (and glow!) until they finally pupate and eventually hatch into an adult. This is where it all goes horribly wrong – the good news is that their only function is to reproduce (usually the male is waiting for the female to emerge from the pupa – sounds familiar!) but the bad news is they have no mouth, so only survive a few days. Still, no parental responsibility, or “glowing” old gracefully, I guess!

With very little else to do in Waitomo apart from activities involving the caves (and lots of money – black water rafting, climbing etc.) , I was beginning to envy the glowworms, but after a quick look in the local guide book, I witnessed one of the funniest and strangest sights I’d seen on all my travels so far.

Just down the road from my hostel, I noticed a sign advertising “The Shearing Shed”. Thinking it was something to do with sheep, I’d not really taken much notice, but on closer inspection it appeared to be where big white fluffy Angora rabbits were bred and sheared for an audience. They claim to be approved by the SPCA, and without being sheared the rabbits would overheat and die, so I felt morally obliged to go and check it out. I began to have my doubts when poor “Flopsy” was tied to what looked like a torture chamber rack (to stop him wriggling) while being shaved by a lady who looked to be enjoying it a bit too much. Fortunately our big eared friend lived to see another carrot, and by all accounts was much relieved to be rid of his heavy coat (unlike the tourists who were much relieved of their money in the “knitted goods” shop on the way out).

After a token hike up a nearby hill, I spent the rest of the afternoon on the internet planning the next few days of my stay in the North Island. Next stop….Rotarua.

Auckland from the Harbour

Auckland from the Harbour


OK...Just one more glass then....

OK...Just one more glass then....


Paihia Bay of Islands

Paihia Bay of Islands


Cape Reinga

Cape Reinga


The Rock with the hole in it

The Rock with the hole in it


OK It WAS me that stole Mr McGregor's Carrots

OK It WAS me that stole Mr McGregor's Carrots


Sky Tower Auckland

Sky Tower Auckland


Onetangi Beach, Waiheke Island

Onetangi Beach, Waiheke Island


Blackpool Beach, Waiheke

Blackpool Beach, Waiheke


Diwali Celebrations Auckland

Diwali Celebrations Auckland


Is there nothing they won't shear???

Is there nothing they won't shear???


Winery Waiheke Island

Winery Waiheke Island


Sign designed by a budding mathematician!

Sign designed by a budding mathematician!


Returning to Auckland

Returning to Auckland


Diwali Fireworks

Diwali Fireworks


View from Mount Eden

View from Mount Eden


View from One Tree Hill

View from One Tree Hill


Lovely Old Auckland House

Lovely Old Auckland House


Silver Fern

Silver Fern


Cape Reinga

Cape Reinga


The meeting of the oceans

The meeting of the oceans


A Long Way From Home

A Long Way From Home


Dune Surfing

Dune Surfing


Kauri Tree

Kauri Tree


Otehai Bay, Bay of Islands

Otehai Bay, Bay of Islands


Dolphins - Bay of Islands

Dolphins - Bay of Islands


Flower - Russell

Flower - Russell


Worrying...But Strangely Exciting

Worrying...But Strangely Exciting

Posted by kathystravels 16:00 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)